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i have a 87 325is i just installed a new clutch. i drained the fluid out of the slave cylinder and put new fluid in. i cant build any pressure in the line. when you push the clutch it hits the floor and stays down. so i bled the line so no air bubbles came through the lines. i pumped the pedal like 10000 times so when you press the clutch pedal it comes back up istead of staying to the floor. but every time i bled it it made it worse and the pedal would stay to the ground again. so i finally got it so when you press the clutch it comes back up to normal postion(flush to brake pedal) but when i turn on the car there no pressure just enough to shift gears. i can only feel pressure when the pedals almost to the ground. WHAT SHOULD I DO?? also i bled the brakes and there was plenty of pressure but when i drove it hardly any pressure like the clutch pedal and the new pads were dragging/ catching on the new rotors.(crossdrilled) im thinking it needs some silicone behind the pads to stick to the caliper. i applied some but i guess not enough. also can you use the brake pad sensor with cross/slotted rotors? the front sensor wasnt like the rear where its like a small pad that wears down with the discpad. it was a square platic piece with a metal prong thing coming out ive never seen one like this before.( tip looks like the tip of a spark plug/part the wire attaches to) i got it from bavauto. NEED HELP ASAP THE MOST IMPORTANT IS THE CLUTCH FLUID/PRESSURE. reservoir is full. ANY IDEAS?????????
 

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Hehe, those slaves are a pain.. Conventional bleeding doesn't seem to work for these things. What method did you use? Are you using a power bleeder, or the pump method? Power bleeding doesn't really work for me at work, and I never really tried the 2 man game.....but here's what I do:

1. Remove the slave cylinder from the tranny, but leave the line attatched.
2. Find somewhere on the body of the car that you can push the slave rod into.
3. With your wrench at the ready, start to push the slave rod into the slave by pressing it against your object of choice.
4. Once you start it moving, crack the bleeder screw, and push the slave rod all the way down, and tighten the bleeder.
5. Let the slave rod extend on it's own, and repeat the procedure a few times, or until all the air is out.

What this does is it pushes the air and fluid out when you compress the slave cylinder, and when it comes back out on it's own, with the bleeder CLOSED, it sucks fluid out of the reservoir.
Works like a charm for me.

ANOTHER method that I was told works, but never could get any results from, is to take an old oil can squirter with a small nozzle on it. Fill the can with fluid, attatch a vacuum hose from the pump to the bleeder, and pump fluid INTO the slave, and into the reservoir. Theoretically, this pushes all the air up and out into the reservoir.
It's worth a shot.
 

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If you have no pedal with the brakes, there is probably air in the system. You may have to bleed them again. Be careful that the reservoir stays full of fluid. Start with the wheel farthes from the master cylinder, and work you way to the closest.
If your car has drum brakes on the rear, the pedal can move too far down before it bites if the rear brakes aren't adjusted right. I don't think you have drums though......I may be wrong.
 

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There are a couple of springs.

One on the pedal to keep it from riding on the clutch master cylinder.

An overcenter spring and cam to make the pedal feel lighter.

The spring in the clutch master cylinder that pushes the piston aft to get a new supply of fluid.

Failure of any or sludge stopping the master piston from returning can give this type of failure.

The issue was not seen before because you had some air in the clutch line that provided a bounce to get the piston back.

When you started the bleeding it removed the air bubble that was saving you.

Most find replacing the clutch master better than overhaul since it is a matter of removal even to put a kit in.

Most also do the slave when the master needs changed since they share fluid and if one is failed the other is close.

I use a power bleeder and have never had any unfixable issues.

Later,
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Originally posted by TECH+Jan 25 2004, 12:41 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (TECH @ Jan 25 2004, 12:41 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-precision tuner@Jan 24 2004, 04:47 PM
thanks guys. TECH thanks for the trick about pulling the slave out. im gonna try that
Any luck? [/b][/quote]
im gonna try it later. ive been real busy, ill let you know how it turns out. thanks for all of your help
 
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