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Old 03-05-2005, 06:26 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Hey all. I thank all of you for your input in response to my many questions.

Here is another:

I have always waxed my car one section at a time. Appied the wax in a circular motion and then removed it with a dry cloth, again in a circular motion. Now I read this website: http://www.bmw325i.net/maint_wax_car.shtml and all of this is contradicted.

I really like this guys site. He does a wonderful job and I have already used some of his ideas, thoughts, and tricks however.........................


What do you guys have to say????

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Old 03-05-2005, 10:28 PM   #2 (permalink)
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I have quite a different take on car care. Wash, clay, polish, seal.
Heres my washing techniques....I wrote this for another forum.

I thought i would start a thread entitled Proper Washing Methods. I’ve been reading some threads on other forums, its amazing how people wash there cars! So let’s get started: The first thing you would like to do is pick a shaded area, this will help in permitting water spotting later. Items you will need for this venture are : 2 buckets, car wash, sheepskin mitt or microfiber mitt/towels, waffle weave drying towel, wheel brush, hose nozzle, a safe wheel cleaner, maybe some tire cleaner. Some folks like to clean wheels first, so I won’t get into the particulars of that, its fairly easy, and basic. Apply a safe wheel cleaner, to one wheel at a time, clean with brush or suitable cleaning tool, rinse, and continue to the next. While your car is cool, and hopefully in the shade, start hosing the surface off with a high stream of water, start at the top so dirt and contaminants fall over non rinsed areas. Make sure to use a good stream to any side moldings and emblems, you will be amazed at the quantity of dirt hiding in there.
Continue to do this until the entire surface has been rinsed. Remember, top to bottom.....Next add a couple oz of car wash soap to bucket #1, and fill with water, add water to bucket #2. With the sheepskin in hand, or whatever you’ve selected to wash with, gently wipe the surface with suds from a front to back motion, again, your starting at the roof area, then trunk, then hood, then sides. Depending on your speed, and if it is warm and dry out, you may need to rinse each panel after washing, until you have completed the car. Keep your cars surface wet until you’re completely finished. When you find the need to re-dip your sheepskin in the suds, rinse it out in bucket #2, this will remove dirt and contaminants from possibly further scratching the surface. (Your going to want to make sure you have plenty of soap (lubricant) on your sheepskin all the while washing, this will help to suspend the dirt, and let it be carried off during the rinse.) Use that method throughout your washing. After the vehicle is completely finished, remove the nozzle from the hose end, and let the water exit the hose without any added pressure. Hold the hose a couple inches from the roof surface, and start at the high end of the vehicle. Chase the water across the surface with the flow exiting the hose. Run/sheet the water across the surface, and continue with the hood, and rear deck, and sides.
When all is said and done, open the hood and trunk, and let the remaining water sheet itself off while you dry the sides with a Waffle Weave drying towel. (At this point, some like to use quick detailers or Eagle One’s “Wax as u Dry”.) Start at the top, and work your way down to lower panels, refold the waffle weave as it absorbs water, a 24x30 towel is generally all that is needed. You may want to follow in your other hand with a clean and dry microfiber 16x16 towel.
You may find this technique of benefit to you, and if so, you may be able to tweak it a little to meet your specific needs. Good luck and I hope to have helped at least a few of you!
If anyone needs any additional questions answered, or some help in product selection, just PM me !
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Old 03-05-2005, 10:29 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Heres my claying techniques....

No complete detail is complete unless you have "clayed" your vehicles surface. Kind of a strange name for a product, but I assure you its completely safe when used as directed. It can be rather intimidating if you have never used before, but once you have, you’ll wonder why you waited so long. Clay is designed to pull contaminants away or simply sheer them from your paint surface, safely, and this is accomplished with ease.
So what equipment or materials is needed? There’s no equipment needed at all! All you need is clay, and a lubricant, and a micro fiber towel for wiping upon completion. Now you can skip the towel if you elect to clay while washing.
There are many brands of clay available, and at least two are usually available at your local auto paint supply store or Automotive parts store (Kragen, Pep Boys). Meguiars makes a new version, better than its preceding version, Mothers makes a nice kit, comes with the clay, a lubricant (Showtime QD), and a small sample of Pre Wax Cleaner. The original Clay Magic I believe still comes with a lubricant as well. Make sure you buy or are using “Fine grade” in the beginning stages.

So lets get started !
Lets assume, it’s the beginning of summer, and you want your ride looking the ultimate! You begin with your normal wash routine (see Proper washing techniques), you’ve removed any tar, gum, and assorted crap stuck to the lower panels with a citrus cleaner or tar/adhesive remover (3M comes to mind). Now you have dried the surfaces with a waffle weave drying towel, and "she" looks good, you rub your hand along the top of the hood, and you feel what seems like specs of sand (If you think it feels good at this point, put your hand in a sandwich baggy)..... Close analysis, its actually tiny bits of metal (Brake linings, rail dust), or just normal industrial fallout. Its inescapable, pollutants happen to everyone, and the reason we need to remove these pollutants is, metal contributes to rust, and once rust starts, it’s usually not good! Not to mention physical appearance anyway.
Make sure your working in a shaded area, on a cool surface. Once you get started, the whole process can be completed in about ½ hr. Lets start with the hood. Unwrap your clay product, and take about 1/3 to ½ of it in the palm of your hand. Place the other portion back in the wrapper it came in, you may need this in case you drop the 1st half. If you do drop it, discard it. Spray the lubricant on about ½ to 1/3 of the surface, just as you would while quick detailing it. Take the clay in your hand and knead it until its somewhat soft. Mold to about the size of a small pancake, and place at your fingertips for easy control. Gently place the clay on the surface and glide it back in a front to back motion (grill to window). Use about 10-12 inch passes and overlap each pass. Fold the clay after each area has been cleaned. You will feel some resistance at first, but with passing motions, you’ll be able to tell the clay is removing pollutants! If you feel too much resistance, your either not using enough lubricant or your surface is REAL dirty. A good way to tell you’re not using enough lube or if your surface is too warm, is the clay is leaving product on the surface. This can be removed, with a micro fiber towel. After each area has been clayed, wipe and buff dry with a micro fiber towel.
Clay will remove a portion of wax or sealant protection, so you should follow up with polishing and sealing/waxing. Clay is not a polish! It will remove contaminants, small areas of road tar, road paint, over spray, fallout, and light oxidation. Any areas larger than an eraser tip should be cleaned with a cleaner prior to using clay, otherwise you will end up polluting your clay for future use. You should be able to clay your surface half a dozen times, depending on the quantity of contaminants.
If anyone has additional comments or concerns, feel free to post, or PM me !
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Old 03-05-2005, 10:31 PM   #4 (permalink)
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PC Techniques.....

Proper PC methods...
For those of you already familiar with a Porter Cable 7424, some of this may be old news, some new, I just hope it helps those who are just considering or just bought a PC:
Your main goal with a PC, is to give your BMW, a surface treatment, unequal to what you have been doing by hand. The orbital polisher pad, travels in multi dimensional circles. The pad itself rotates, and the base itself rotates, sort of circles inside of circles. This makes it nearly impossible to leave swirl marks, due to its random movement. Also, chemicals react differently to temperatures built up within the pad and product. We’re not talking real heat, just warming it up, more than your hand could.

There are a variety of foam pads available, anything from cutting, to finishing. Obviously cutting pads which are more abrasive, will require less of an abrasive product to perform there work , whereas a more abrasive product, with a less abrasive pad, may perform identically. A cutting pad with an abrasive product rated at 5, may perform the same as a product rated at 7 with a polishing pad (less abrasive). The majority of your "maintenance" work should be performed with either a polishing or finishing pad. I’m assuming you have a backing plate ? PM me with questions……. Polishing pads may be referred to as a Meguiars yellow or Propel Blue or Green, finishing pads may be referred to as a Tan Meguiars or Propel Black pads. Either of the above are great for most needs, and we will only refer to these two types for this discussion.
Assuming your surface prep (wash, clay) has been completed, we can now address the capabilities and directions for use.
The PC, is a lot lighter than most conventional rotary polishers, however it can become heavy when you’re using it for hours on end, to polish, level, and finish a job. It cannot perform miracles, you may think it can and you may think it did. But we need to keep the job in perspective, it’s not a rotary polisher, and we are not using wool pads here. Anything worse than moderate swirling, and you may end up wasting your time, your product, and your patience. It does deliver though, and in a big way. Light scratches and swirling will diminish with proper pad, and product selection.
The worst thing I could imagine is letting the PC loose while on hi speed, and having it run across your hood or toes! The machine is equipped with speed settings from 3-6, it come with a handle, which you should leave on until your very comfortable manipulating it. I highly recommend leaving it on for several uses. I have performed many jobs with mine and still have it on; I guess it’s my little security blanket.
I prefer to “get busy” and work on a rather large area at a time, say ½ a hood, im talking Suburban here guys. But im comfortable doing that, ive been doing it this way for some time. Until you get comfortable, and real comfy I may add, stick with a smaller section, say ¼ hood etc. I apply my product in little spots, at 12, 3, 6, 9 o’clock, to the pad. Then I smear it in with my fingers for even distribution, immediately. Set at a low speed, say 3.5 (were polishing, so its either a yellow Megs pad, or Blue/Green Propel pad) set the pad on the surface, and kind of smear the product around in a small area. Turn the machine on, while holding firmly, and go to a starting point, (lets work ¼ of the hood) preferably ½ the distance from the other side, always work towards yourself, this alleviates the cord from getting on areas you have just polished. Also, it’s a good practice to put the cord over your shoulder. I use three passes for each area. My 1st pass is a left to right, this applies the product, make sure you overlap each pass at least ¼ pad width. The 2nd pass, at about 4.5-5, is a up/down pass, this gets the product in the pores, and begins the polishing stages, again, overlap each pass. The 3rd pass is where I “hook it up”! This is where I get the work done, where the clear meets its destiny, this is where edges are rounded, oxidation is removed, and product dries, im at speed 6 now. At each level, let the machine do the work, its weight, I feel is sufficient for the work desired. Now all of this aforementioned advice, works for me, with the product im using, normally Meg’s #80, or DACP, or a maintenance polish (Stuf Polish is above average) The first pass is a slow introduction pass, I move the machine slowly, but fast enough so by the end, the product hasn’t dried! Second pass, I move a little faster, but so is the machine, so there’s compensation, and finally the last pass, the machines at 6, which is a good clip. The product may actually be dried at this point, but with diminishing abrasives, that’s ok! Its very important to experiment with speeds, that your comfortable with, with the various products you may be using, to obtain the desired results your expecting.
Now with sealants, or waxes, your not expecting oxidation or swirl removal, all your worried about is even product distribution. I usually use the Propel Black or Blue Finishing pad, or Meg’s Tan pad. Sealants wont dry as fast as polishes so you have more time to accomplish evenness. I usually operate the machine at about 4.5, but again, distribute, then cover…..
Last but not least, I will remove the sealant by hand with a good microfiber, then throw a new pad on the PC, add a microfiber Platina Bonnet, set the machine to 4, and hit the on button. Feel free to take wide paths while doing this, its amazing what that machine with a microfiber bonnet will do !!
For a list of providers (other than myself), just PM me. I’d be happy give you some ideas.
Good luck and I hope this has helped at least one of you !!
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Old 03-06-2005, 08:38 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Originally posted by exceldetail@Mar 6 2005, 12:31 AM
PC Techniques.....

Proper PC methods...
For those of you already familiar with a Porter Cable 7424, some of this may be old news, some new, I just hope it helps those who are just considering or just bought a PC:
Your main goal with a PC, is to give your BMW, a surface treatment, unequal to what you have been doing by hand. The orbital polisher pad, travels in multi dimensional circles. The pad itself rotates, and the base itself rotates, sort of circles inside of circles. This makes it nearly impossible to leave swirl marks, due to its random movement. Also, chemicals react differently to temperatures built up within the pad and product. We’re not talking real heat, just warming it up, more than your hand could.

There are a variety of foam pads available, anything from cutting, to finishing. Obviously cutting pads which are more abrasive, will require less of an abrasive product to perform there work , whereas a more abrasive product, with a less abrasive pad, may perform identically. A cutting pad with an abrasive product rated at 5, may perform the same as a product rated at 7 with a polishing pad (less abrasive). The majority of your "maintenance" work should be performed with either a polishing or finishing pad. I’m assuming you have a backing plate ? PM me with questions……. Polishing pads may be referred to as a Meguiars yellow or Propel Blue or Green, finishing pads may be referred to as a Tan Meguiars or Propel Black pads. Either of the above are great for most needs, and we will only refer to these two types for this discussion.
Assuming your surface prep (wash, clay) has been completed, we can now address the capabilities and directions for use.
The PC, is a lot lighter than most conventional rotary polishers, however it can become heavy when you’re using it for hours on end, to polish, level, and finish a job. It cannot perform miracles, you may think it can and you may think it did. But we need to keep the job in perspective, it’s not a rotary polisher, and we are not using wool pads here. Anything worse than moderate swirling, and you may end up wasting your time, your product, and your patience. It does deliver though, and in a big way. Light scratches and swirling will diminish with proper pad, and product selection.
The worst thing I could imagine is letting the PC loose while on hi speed, and having it run across your hood or toes! The machine is equipped with speed settings from 3-6, it come with a handle, which you should leave on until your very comfortable manipulating it. I highly recommend leaving it on for several uses. I have performed many jobs with mine and still have it on; I guess it’s my little security blanket.
I prefer to “get busy” and work on a rather large area at a time, say ½ a hood, im talking Suburban here guys. But im comfortable doing that, ive been doing it this way for some time. Until you get comfortable, and real comfy I may add, stick with a smaller section, say ¼ hood etc. I apply my product in little spots, at 12, 3, 6, 9 o’clock, to the pad. Then I smear it in with my fingers for even distribution, immediately. Set at a low speed, say 3.5 (were polishing, so its either a yellow Megs pad, or Blue/Green Propel pad) set the pad on the surface, and kind of smear the product around in a small area. Turn the machine on, while holding firmly, and go to a starting point, (lets work ¼ of the hood) preferably ½ the distance from the other side, always work towards yourself, this alleviates the cord from getting on areas you have just polished. Also, it’s a good practice to put the cord over your shoulder. I use three passes for each area. My 1st pass is a left to right, this applies the product, make sure you overlap each pass at least ¼ pad width. The 2nd pass, at about 4.5-5, is a up/down pass, this gets the product in the pores, and begins the polishing stages, again, overlap each pass. The 3rd pass is where I “hook it up”! This is where I get the work done, where the clear meets its destiny, this is where edges are rounded, oxidation is removed, and product dries, im at speed 6 now. At each level, let the machine do the work, its weight, I feel is sufficient for the work desired. Now all of this aforementioned advice, works for me, with the product im using, normally Meg’s #80, or DACP, or a maintenance polish (Stuf Polish is above average) The first pass is a slow introduction pass, I move the machine slowly, but fast enough so by the end, the product hasn’t dried! Second pass, I move a little faster, but so is the machine, so there’s compensation, and finally the last pass, the machines at 6, which is a good clip. The product may actually be dried at this point, but with diminishing abrasives, that’s ok! Its very important to experiment with speeds, that your comfortable with, with the various products you may be using, to obtain the desired results your expecting.
Now with sealants, or waxes, your not expecting oxidation or swirl removal, all your worried about is even product distribution. I usually use the Propel Black or Blue Finishing pad, or Meg’s Tan pad. Sealants wont dry as fast as polishes so you have more time to accomplish evenness. I usually operate the machine at about 4.5, but again, distribute, then cover…..
Last but not least, I will remove the sealant by hand with a good microfiber, then throw a new pad on the PC, add a microfiber Platina Bonnet, set the machine to 4, and hit the on button. Feel free to take wide paths while doing this, its amazing what that machine with a microfiber bonnet will do !!
For a list of providers (other than myself), just PM me. I’d be happy give you some ideas.
Good luck and I hope this has helped at least one of you !!
[snapback]304678[/snapback]

Thanks you! Very Helpful.
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Old 03-20-2005, 07:47 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Haha, who owns that site?! Okay, well, he just sounds kinda... ya... anyway... "locate your bottle of wax", "Locate your wax applicator pad", " I like to start from the front and work my way back", "Allow the wax to sit for about 5 minutes. Then locate your buffing towel" ?!?! Have you not seen Karate Kid?! Maybe he's afraid of the swirly marks? If you do it by hand, you won't have a problem... um, and I just stare at the wax until it dries, I don't have an alloted amount of time.

Actually, if you look at the rest of her site, her directions are very.... detailed... and kinda anal. AND, for someone so anal, what brand is she using? I've never seen it before! used
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Old 03-20-2005, 09:55 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Originally posted by BeachBunny@Mar 20 2005, 09:47 AM
Haha, who owns that site?! Okay, well, he just sounds kinda... ya... anyway... "locate your bottle of wax", "Locate your wax applicator pad", " I like to start from the front and work my way back", "Allow the wax to sit for about 5 minutes. Then locate your buffing towel" ?!?! Have you not seen Karate Kid?! Maybe he's afraid of the swirly marks? If you do it by hand, you won't have a problem... um, and I just stare at the wax until it dries, I don't have an alloted amount of time.

Actually, if you look at the rest of her site, her directions are very.... detailed... and kinda anal. AND, for someone so anal, what brand is she using? I've never seen it before! used
[snapback]315058[/snapback]


Didn't your mother ever tell you the rule about saying something nice or nothing at all?

When you take the time to put your own site up that is better then what he has dine then maybe you can criticize him quietly to yourself. Grow up.

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Old 03-21-2005, 01:55 PM   #8 (permalink)
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excel you have sent me to sleep how will i get my car done now

Here is one i recently completed doing the following

1 wash
2 clay bar
3 machine polish to remove swirls
4 cleaner fluid
5 concorso wax(wet look shine)
what do you think guys
http://www.autoshineforum.invisionzone.com...type=post&id =16
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Old 03-24-2005, 08:15 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by tonyspears@Mar 21 2005, 12:55 PM
excel you have sent me to sleep how will i get my car done now

Here is one i recently completed doing the following

1 wash
2 clay bar
3 machine polish to remove swirls
4 cleaner fluid
5 concorso wax(wet look shine)
what do you think guys
http://www.autoshineforum.invisionzone.com...type=post&id =16
[snapback]315739[/snapback]
Cleaner fluid? WWhat is that !?
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Old 03-29-2005, 03:24 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Here's my routine that's prettty similar to exceldetails (which was great) except I couldn't read of all his it got a little too long, I'll try to break it down a little more if possible.
1.) Fill up 2 5-gallon wash buckets about 50% full, using one for clean water with shampoo and one as a dirty, rinse off bucket.
2.) Add 2 caps of P21S Bodywork Shampoo and fill the first wash bucket up to about 80% to suds up the water.
3.) Before I tackle the paint I like to spray P21S Wheel Gel on my wheels and let it sit as I shampoo the paint.
4.) Using a foam wash sponge scrub the entire car from top to bottom. For tougher areas such as the front bumper, behind tires, and low body panels I
like to use this bug and tar removal block. It works great for removing bugs, tar, and other grime that the foam sponge won’t work off.
5.) As the foam sponge gets dirty or loses its suds rinse it out in the 2nd wash bucket and proceed to get more shampoo suds from the first bucket. Do
this until the entire car is washed.
6.) After washing the car I like to clean my tires with 303 Aerospace Protectant then scrub them with a firm bristle tire brush
7.) Before I spray down the car I like to take a wheel brush to my wheels to loosen any debris the wheel cleaner wasn’t able to remove. Once you are
done spray down the entire care from top to bottom.
8.) When the car is rinsed off, (this is a great tip) remove the spray nozzle so water is flowing freely from the hose. Start from the top of the
car and let the water sheet off. This will reduce the time you spend drying a LOT!
9.) I then proceed to dry the car with a large waffle weave microfiber. I feel this is the best drying tool available and is more than adequate to do 2 cars at once! Make sure you open your doors, hood, and trunk and get all the places water loves to seep into. If you have an air compressor this is a good time to use it to blow out mirrors, wheels, around trim, etc.
10.) I will usually make a second pass at the car with another dry waffle weave microfiber towel to ensure all moisture is off the car.
11.) Next step I break out the clay bar. I like to use Clear Kote’s Detailing Clay because it is large enough to cut into 1/3s and store in their handy plastic container.
12.) Spray the quick detailer solution onto the car and gently work the clay in a 2’ x 2’ area. You will notice the paint becoming smoother as you work. If you feel it start to skid apply more solution in that area. Once that area is complete I wipe excess detailing solution with a microfiber towel
13.) Now your paint is ready for some real work. If your paint has swirls you are looking to remove from the winter months (or the past) then this is a great step for you. Select a polish with the proper abrasiveness your paint requires. I like to go with a light abrasive polish since my paint is relatively new. My product of choice is Poorboy’s Super Swirl Remover 1. Apply this product using moderate pressure, otherwise you will not remove
the swirls and scratches. I like to spray my applicator pad with a quick detailing solution for added lubrication before applying the polish. Work
in small 2’ x 2’ sections. Then buff off with a microfiber towel.
14.) Next to really bring out the gloss and shine you want I use a finishing polish. Many people are under the misconception that the wax brings out the
gloss and finish when in reality it is the polish, which many beginners skip. I like to use Klasse All-In-One Polish for optimal shine. Again, apply this product using moderate pressure. I like to spray my applicator pad with a quick detailing solution for added lubrication before applying the polish. Work in small 2’ x 2’ sections. Then buff off with a
microfiber towel
15.) Now its time to seal the paint in with some sealant and wax. What I like to do is layer a couple of coats of sealant for optimal protection and
then follow up with a carnauba coat to give it the wet look. What I found gives the best protection is Klasse High Gloss Sealant Glaze. Depending on
my time restraint I’ll do between 1 and 3 coats. You should wait 8-12 hrs between coats to give the wax time to cure. Apply the sealant very
sparingly using very little pressure. I like to spray my applicator pad with a quick detailing solution for added lubrication before applying the
sealant. Work in small 2’ x 2’ sections. Then buff off with a microfiber towel.
16.) Once I’m done with the sealant I put the finishing touch on the car, a nice layer of carnauba wax. The best carnauba wax out there is P21S
Concours Carnauba Wax. This will give your car additional depth and give it that “wet look”. Apply the same way you would the sealant, very sparingly
using very little pressure. I like to spray my applicator pad with a quick detailing solution for added lubrication before applying the sealant. Work
in small 2’ x 2’ sections. Then buff off with a microfiber towel.
17.) Paint is done! Time to tackle the wheels and tires. Depending on how good a job the wheel and tire cleaners did, these steps may not be needed.
If there is tar, brake dust, etc still on the wheels I like to run a clay bar over them. This is where cutting your clay bar into 1/3s helps b/c you’
ll have a fresh piece just for your wheels. Follow the same procedure as you did on the paint with your wheels to clay them.
18.) After claying them I like to polish them up using P21S Metal Polishing Soap. P21S makes it simple by having the applicator pad handy with the
product. While the metal polishing soap is out I will do my exhaust tips as well as any metal trim.
19.) To prevent more break dust and road grime from clinging to my wheels I like to seal them up with Poorboy’s Wheel Sealant. This will put a protective coating over the wheels and makes it easier to clean next time around.
20.) To finish up the tires I like to apply Poorboy’s Bold ‘N Bright Tire Dressing. This will give them a real nice finish and it is not greasy like other dressings that use silicone.
21.) Tires are done, all that’s left is the glass and trim. I love cleaning my headlight housings with Plexus Plastic Cleaner & Polish. It cleans plastic better than any other product I know of. If there is any other plastic on the car I will finish it off w/ Plexus.
22.) To finish things up on the glass and mirrors I use Diamondite’s 3 Step Glass Cleaning System. The first step is their spray clay which will remove
old wax, acid rain marks, stains etc. from the glass. The second step is a glass foam cleaner which will take off all of the grime removed from the
clay step. The final step is a shield that goes on the glass that helps repel rain and prevent further staining. I use a glass specific microfiber
towel to make sure there is no dust or lint left behind.
23) Step back and view your masterpiece!
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  BMW Forum - BimmerWerkz.com > General Category > Wash & Detail


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