Will a New Era of Turbocharging Bring Back Old Problems? - BMW Forum - BimmerWerkz.com
 
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#1 (permalink) Old 06-23-2012, 07:34 AM
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Will a New Era of Turbocharging Bring Back Old Problems?



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In an effort to squeeze as much power from every car, while making them more fuel-friendly, automakers are increasingly switching their engines to use a technology that’s not exactly new and which isn’t typically associated with fuel economy – turbocharging.

Turbocharged engines are making a huge comeback in the industry as more car buyers are looking for the best performance without having to spend a lot on fuel.

Turbochargers can do exactly that. In many modern applications a turbo is fitted to a small displacement engine, in order to help it reach a higher output than previously thought. This isn’t a new idea. About 20 years ago we experienced a similar surge in turbocharged engines. During the ‘80s and ‘90s, turbos were available on a variety of performance-oriented vehicles. However, many of these had spotty reliability records.

Turbocharged Dodge Stealths and Mitsubishi 3000GTs were prone to blowing engines. The turbos in the 1997-2002 Audi S4s could end up dead after just 60,000 miles, because they ran extremely hot. Third-generation turbocharged Toyota Supras were known to blow head-gaskets too. There are also well-documented issues with cars ranging from the RX-7 to the Dodge Shadow.

NEW TURBO TECHNOLOGY DESIGNED TO DELIVER RELIABILITY TOO

A turbocharger forces more air and fuel into an engine which in turn makes the engine produce more power. But doing this puts extra stress on a car’s components, which can affect performance and reliability.

One trouble spot for turbos of yesteryear was with cooling. When a turbo compresses and forces air into an engine, that air becomes very hot. That heated air would affect the efficiency of the turbocharger, and result not only in worse fuel economy, but in temperatures that exceeded the level the systems were designed to run at. Today however, changes in turbo technology mean that turbochargers are more efficient, and are designed with better ways to cope with the extra heat.

“The technology has matured to the point where turbocharged engines are just as reliable, durable and dependable as naturally aspirated engines,” says Richard Truett from Ford Powetrain communications. “The reason for that has to do mostly with the internal design of turbochargers. Better bearings, cooling and lubrication have solved the reliability problems that plagued turbos in the 1960s, ‘80s and ‘90s.”

With its EcoBoost engines, Ford is bringing turbo-charged engines that aren’t just for the performance-minded enthusiast. “The technology is changing the way our customers consider engines,” says Truett. “An EcoBoost badge on the vehicle tells a customer that he can have performance and fuel economy, and not have to choose between the two.”

As of right now, Ford offers turbocharged, small-displacement engines in a variety of vehicles. The EcoBoost strategy allows Ford to put a turbo-V6 in the Ford F-150 pickup, or even a turbocharged 4-cylinder in Taurus sedan, vehicles that would normally have a bigger motors.

Turbocharging and downsizing engines also allows automakers to reengineer their vehicles.

“Turbos allow us to reduce the size and weight of the vehicle by installing a smaller, turbo engine, and yet still deliver the power and performance of a larger engine,” Truett said. “Our F-150 EcoBoost is a great example of that. It delivers V8 power and towing with V6 fuel economy.”

The V6 in the EcoBoost F-150 makes 365 hp and 420 lb-ft of torque and gets a combined EPA-tested rating of 18 mpg. Compare that to the competitions’ V6 pickups which don’t have nearly as much power or torque, and some don’t get as impressive mpg numbers. The real eye-opener comes when you compare the F-150 EcoBoost to its V8 rivals, which get comparable power numbers, but can’t get close to the fuel-economy numbers.

“EcoBoost is hugely important to Ford,” says Truett “Going forward, we plan to offer an EcoBoost engine in 90 percent of our North American vehicles by 2014. Some vehicles, such as Taurus, Escape and Fusion, will offer a choice of two EcoBoost engines.”
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#2 (permalink) Old 06-23-2012, 03:12 PM
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We will see whether the claims and the truth match up in a few years.

I'm sure the engineers in the 80's and 90's thought they had the problems licked, too.

I'll stick with NA for a few more years, thank you.

It's like new miracle meds: sound like magic until thousands start dying of mysterious heart attacks.



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#3 (permalink) Old 06-23-2012, 05:18 PM
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I prefer the NA BMW engines. Turbo'ing is great and all, but i want a car thats not going to cost me more then the payments to fix. At least the NA engines are still decent to work on.


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#4 (permalink) Old 06-25-2012, 09:39 PM
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328 vs 335 maintenance

As far as turbo for the recent 3 series....how does the 328 compare to the 335 for the last few years in maintenance and durability? I've seen forum responses about 335 fuel pump issues.....are there similar ones for 328? Does turbocharging the same engine affect the long-term durability, like for engines going well over 100K ?
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#5 (permalink) Old 06-25-2012, 10:21 PM
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Turbocharging will effect long term durability. The idea of a turbo is FORCING air into the combustion chamber. Turbo engines are known for not surviving as long.


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